Electromagnetic link to nerve disease

Modesto Morganelli
Marzo 31, 2017

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a rare neurodegenerative disease of unknown origin that is now untreatable.

"This study has much better information on exposure to magnetic fields than previous studies".

Those whose jobs had exposed them to high levels of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields were more than twice as likely to develop ALS as those who had never been exposed through their work, the study suggested.

Research in The BMJ drew a link between such exposure and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive degeneration of the motor nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. Gradually, patients with ALS become unable to chew, walk, or even breathe. The disease then wastes away the muscles in the body until it can not function anymore and death follows typically between two to five years after the first symptoms are diagnosed.

There is now no cure, and those affected usually die within a few years of diagnosis.

"Motor neurone disease is a devastating and complex disease, and it is likely that a wide range of triggers, from environmental to genetic, will cause an individual to get the condition", says Brian Dickie, of United Kingdom charity the Motor Neurone Disease Association.

Previous research has pointed to a variety of occupational exposures that may drive the illness.

The correlations found in these studies, however, have been questioned due to methodological flaws in the analysis. They still maintain that a broad range of factors from the environment to genetics can cause a person to develop ALS.

The research was carried out by scientists from Utrecht University, Maastricht University, and the University Medical Center Utrecht - all in the Netherlands - and the results were published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

The study led by Dr. Roel Vermeulen found that the data collected from over 60,000 men and women showed that those who worked in electrical industries are twice more likely to develop ALS than those who don't have occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields, New Scientist reported. This has been looking at diet and cancer and has involved more than 58,000 men and more than 62,000 women, who were all aged between 55 and 69 when they were first entered the study in 1986. Seventy-six men and 60 women who died of ALS during this time were compared to a control group of about 4,000 randomly selected people.

Calculations were amassed by gender.

Overall, the study revealed that occupational exposure to ELF-MFs increased the risk of developing ALS in men.

High levels of electromagnetic field exposure were largely confined to the men, and depended on job type.

Furthermore, those in the top 30 per cent of cumulative exposure were almost twice as likely to develop the disease.

The study did not find a proportional link between ALS risk and the amount of exposure.

Those whose jobs had exposed them to high levels of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields were more than twice as likely to develop ALS as those who had never been exposed through their work, the study suggested.

Altre relazioniGrafFiotech

Discuti questo articolo

Segui i nostri GIORNALE