Former US Rep. Anthony Weiner faces charges in sexting case

Remigio Civitarese
Mag 19, 2017

Former New York congressman Anthony Weiner will plead guilty to sending obscene material to a minor, USA media report.

Former congressman Anthony Weiner, whose penchant for sexting strangers online ended his political career and led to an investigation that upended the presidential race, will appear in federal court Friday to plead guilty to charges in connection with his online communications with a 15-year-old girl, officials said.

The FBI began investigating Weiner in September after a 15-year-old North Carolina girl told a tabloid news site that she and the disgraced former politician had exchanged lewd messages for several months.

At the time, Weiner said: "I have repeatedly demonstrated awful judgment about the people I have communicated with online and the things I have sent", he said. While I have provided the Daily Mail with information showing that I have likely been the subject of a hoax, I have no one to blame but me for putting myself in this position.

A spokesman for the law firm representing Weiner, Covington & Burling, said he would plead guilty before U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska on Friday morning but offered no further details.

The investigation of his laptop led to the discovery of a cache of emails from Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to her aide Huma Abedin, Weiner's wife, renewing a probe into her use of a private email server while secretary of state.

As a result, James Comey, then director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced in late October that the agency was reviewing the messages to determine whether Clinton had mishandled official correspondence.

That inquiry was brief. Comey announced shortly before the election that the new emails contained nothing to change his view that Clinton could not be charged with a crime. But Clinton partly blamed her election loss to Republican Donald Trump on Comey's announcement.

Weiner, once considered a rising star in the Democratic Party, had represented his congressional district in Brooklyn and Queens for nearly 12 years before he stepped down in 2011 after admitting to sending sexually explicit social media messages and texts to women. In 2013, he mounted a bid for mayor, but became embroiled in a second scandal and lost the Democratic primary to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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