UN Ready to Impose Further Sanctions on North Korea

Remigio Civitarese
Mag 19, 2017

The council said that launches by North Korea reveal development in nuclear weapons delivery systems, which were increasing tensions around the world.

In a unanimous statement backed by China, the council stressed the importance of North Korea 'immediately showing honest commitment to de-nuclearisation through concrete action'.

A closed-door emergency Council session was set for tomorrow.

The pledge came at a meeting between a senior North Korean foreign ministry official and diplomatic representatives from four Southeast Asian countries, including Vietnam and Laos, over its latest test of a new ballistic missile.

North Korea has maintained that the missile test was in response to the nuclear dangers and threats posed by the US and its allies.

In a historical shift in foreign policy, China might support a new round of sanctions by the United Nations (UN) against North Korea after its recent missile test, according to observers.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un supervised the launch of the Hwasong-12 missile on May 14 that reached an altitude of 2,111.5 kilometers (1,312 miles) and flew 787 kilometers.

"More importantly", he added, it "may represent a substantial advance to developing an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM)".

On Monday morning, North Korea officially confirmed that it had conducted the launch of a medium-range ballistic missile a day before.

"Kim Jong-Un is in a state of paranoia, he's incredibly concerned about anything and everything around him", US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley told ABC News.

The North has made no secret of its quest to develop a missile capable of delivering a nuclear warhead to the continental United States - something President Donald Trump has vowed "won't happen". Pundits believe Pyongyang's latest provocation will provide a hard litmus test for South Korea's newly-elected President Moon Jae-in.

"We consider (the missile test) counter-productive, harmful and unsafe", Putin told reporters after an worldwide forum in Beijing.

Newly elected President Moon Jae-in said the South had to "learn to say 'no, '" to the US and to exhaust diplomatic ways of resolving issues with the North. In April Pyongyang put dozens of missiles on show at a giant military parade through the capital, including one that appeared to be the type launched on Sunday.

There's also skepticism about North Korea's claims about its re-entry technology, which is needed to return a warhead to the atmosphere from space so it can hit its intended target.

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