ICJ's Jadhav verdict just a beginning, not victory: Soli Sorabjee

Remigio Civitarese
Mag 20, 2017

Judges at the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruled in a unanimous and binding decision that Kulbhushan Sudhir Jadhav must not be executed by Islamabad until they have had time to pass final judgement in the case.

Aziz, however, maintained that Qureshi had "courageously" presented Pakistan's case in the court, the Nation reported.

Meanwhile, Pakistan adviser on foreign affairs, Sartaj Aziz said Islamabad would decide about the consular access to Jadhav in the light of "national security dynamics".

Describing the ICJ verdict as a major victory for India and also a victory for justice and human rights, Mengal said, "The Pakistani government, intelligence agencies and the Army have been carrying atrocities and acts of genocide against the Baloch people".

Jadhav, a former Navy officer, was arrested in March 2016 from Balochistan, Pakistan claimed.

India has maintained that Jadhav was abducted from Iran, where he was pursuing his business, and passed off as a spy.

His statement was in conflict with that of the foreign office which said Pakistan does not accept ICJ's jurisdiction in matters related to the national security.

On its part, Pakistan had told the ICJ that Vienna Convention provisions on consular access were not intended for a "spy" involved in terror activities and charged India with using the world body as a stage for "political theatre" in the Jadhav case.

Despite several requests, the Indian government has also not been provided the first information report (FIR), charge-sheet, or a copy of the Pakistani military court's verdict against 46-year-old Jadhav.

It also noted the urgency of the case since Pakistan had given "no assurance that Mr Jadhav will not be executed before the court has rendered its final decision".

London-based Barrister Rashid Aslam said Pakistan was ill-prepared and did not utilise the 90 minutes it had to make its argument.

Earlier, Zakaria said at the weekly press briefing said India was trying to portray Jadhavs case “as a humanitarian issue to divert the worlds attention from his role in fomenting terrorism” inside Pakistan.

The minister said the "Indian spy" was convicted after fulfilling all necessary legal procedures and any decision on the matter will be taken keeping in view national security.

Its rulings are binding. "Justice has been served and it is proven that Pakistan's courts are mere kangaroo courts and nothing else", one friend Sachin Kale said.

"The International community must put pressure on Pakistan".

Abraham added that under the Vienna Convention, India should have received consular access to seek justice for the former Indian Naval officer.

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