United Kingdom hospital seeks court hearing on new Charlie Gard evidence

Modesto Morganelli
Luglio 9, 2017

A GOSH spokesman said: 'Two global hospitals and their researchers have communicated to us as late as the last 24 hours that they have fresh evidence about their proposed experimental treatment. However, doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), where he's being kept alive have been denying the parents the right to try and save their child and United Kingdom and European courts have backed them up. The case is due to be heard at the High Court in London on Monday.

Charlie inherited the faulty RRM2B gene from his parents, affecting the cells responsible for energy production and respiration and leaving him unable to move or breathe without a ventilator.

The Sun reported the family had spoken to the father of young cancer patient Ashya King, whose parents took him out of hospital and overseas for proton beam therapy not offered on the NHS.

But British and European courts have sided with the hospital's decision that the 11-month-old's life support should end, saying therapy would not help and would cause more suffering. It had won a series of court rulings, most recently last week, authorising it to withdraw life support.

Great Ormond Street Hospital's statement was the latest twist in a case that has raised hard bioethical and legal questions, and has caught the attention of Pope Francis and United States President Donald Trump.

But after last minute interventions from US President Donald Trump and the Pope, who have both offered to provide treatment, there will be a new court hearing.

"Two global hospitals and their researchers have communicated to us as late as the last 24 hours that they have fresh evidence about their proposed experimental treatment", the hospital said in a statement released on Friday.

The hospital is now bound by court rulings barring it from sending Charlie anywhere for the experimental treatment, nucleoside therapy. It also calls for Charlie's artificial ventilation to be withdrawn, and he should receive palliative care only.

GOSH said it will now be for the High Court to make its judgement on the facts.

"Our priority has always been, and will always be, the best interests of Charlie Gard".

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