Here's how you can see the Perseid Meteor Shower Saturday night

Rodiano Bonacci
Agosto 13, 2017

Across Idaho and the nation, people are gearing up for a celestial event of epic proportions: the August 21 solar eclipse.

The Perseid meteor shower is poised to reach its peak this weekend (12/13 August), giving stargazers a chance to get a rare glimpse of a spectacular night-time display.

This year the peak of the meteor shower fell in the night from 11 to 12 August, but experts claim that the night of the 13th of August will be no less spectacular. The space agency stated that they are expecting 150 meteors per hour, which is 10 times smaller than the Leonid meteor storms of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Light pollution can make it more hard to see the shower. This means it will be nearly impossible to see any meteors after the moon rises.

A meteor shower is in fact small chunk of a single, large comet falling into Earth's atmosphere. Debris from the comet breaks off and can drift in space for years before being captured by Earth's gravity and falling into the sky.

John French, MSU Abrams Planetarium said, "Best place to try to observe a meteor shower is really from any really dark location". In fact, the meteors which we see nearly certainly broke off from Swift-Tuttle during its 1862 visit and not the 1992 visit. The Perseids promise to be unusually bright 80-100 instead of "shooting stars" per hour, you will see up to 200 meteors.

Even if your attempts to view the Perseid showers are stymied, do not be too disappointed. After the moon is up, that number drops to about 20 to 30 meteors an hour.

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