United Kingdom government wins key Brexit parliamentary battle

Remigio Civitarese
Giugno 13, 2018

But these putative pledges by the PM are inconsistent with Tuesday night's statement by Davis's officials that any new amendment relating to the power of MPs to accept or reject a Brexit deal must not restrict her negotiating freedom - or restrict her ability to sign whatever treaty with the European Union she would like.

The government insisted it would not allow MPs to tie its hands in Brexit negotiations, despite being forced to offer a last-ditch concession to Tory rebels to stave off a House of Commons defeat.

British Prime Minister Theresa May is urging feuding Conservative lawmakers to unite and prevent the government from being defeated in key votes on its main Brexit bill.

After winning Tuesday's vote on changes to a future "meaningful vote" on a final agreement with Brussels in her European Union withdrawal bill, May's plans to end more than 40 years of membership in the bloc were still on track. That has potentially seismic consequences for the protracted and increasingly messy split from Brussels.

With the Conservatives having a majority of just 13 thanks to the support of the DUP, it would only take a handful of Tories to side with Labour and defeat the Government.

The right-wing press is presenting the upcoming votes as a make-or-break moment, continuing its longstanding tactic of describing the Brexit process as the "will of the people" and any attempts to seek greater democratic oversight of the process as "undemocratic".

The pro-EU faction got a boost when junior justice minister Phillip Lee resigned Tuesday, saying he could no longer support the government's "irresponsible" plans for Brexit.

If the government avoids defeat, is Brexit a done deal?

"We have not, and will not, agree to the House of Commons binding the government's hands in the negotiations". He said he would vote against the prime minister.

But she faces a gruelling bout of "parliamentary ping-pong" with the Lords, as the Bill bounces back and forth between the two Houses over the coming weeks.

Details of precisely what this will involve will be agreed in the coming days when the bill is due to return to the House of Lords and ministers could table a fresh amendment.

If agreed, ministers would have until the end of November this year to secure a Brexit deal before seeking the approval of parliament.

May is resisting changes approved by the House of Lords that would soften Britain's exit from the European Union, because she says they will weaken the government's negotiating position.

"The Brexit secretary has set out three tests that any new amendment has to meet - not undermining the negotiations, not changing the constitutional role of parliament and government in negotiating global treaties, and respecting the referendum result".

"We will be talking to the government immediately after this in order to find a common way forward".

Asked about what had been promised, Mr Buckland, the solicitor general, said the government remained "open-minded" but he would not "blithely" commit to any changes until he had had those conversations.

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