Historic meeting in Singapore

Remigio Civitarese
Giugno 14, 2018

Kim and Trump arrived in tropical Singapore on Sunday for the first ever face-to-face meeting by leaders of two countries that have been enemies since the 1950-1953 Korean War.

North Korea has told the United States that it's prepared to discuss denuclearization at the June 12 summit between its leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump.

At 10am, North Korean vice-minister for foreign affairs, Choi Sun-hee, strode into the Ritz Carlton with her small team.

Finally, on Monday morning, the Korean Central News Agency, or KCNA, reported Kim was in Singapore, had met with Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and would meet Trump on Tuesday.

Around twenty minutes earlier, Trump's top North Korea negotiator, ambassador to the Philippines Sung Kim, arrived with one adviser, smiling at a scrum of television cameras and reporters gathered outside the hotel.

Outside the Istana, the presidential palace where Trump was due to meet Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, well-wishers displayed American flags and a boy held up a sign reading: "I love President Trump!" But on the eve of the summit, the White House unexpectedly announced Trump would depart Singapore by Tuesday evening, meaning his time with Kim would be fairly brief.

There has been no indication Rodman would be involved in any official talks at the summit, which is aimed at getting North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons and missiles in exchange for economic incentives and security guarantees.

The North, many experts believe, stands on the brink of being able to target the entire US mainland with its nuclear-armed missiles, and while there's deep skepticism that Kim will quickly give up those hard-won nukes, there's also some hope that diplomacy can replace the animosity between the USA and the North.

Trump said last week that Rodman had not been invited to Singapore.

The summit has raised hopes of progress towards a peace treaty to formally end the Korean War, the last festering legacy of the Cold War, after hostilities only stopped with an armistice.

North Korea's concept of denuclearization, made clear through years of failed discussions with the worldwide community, "bears no resemblance to the American definition", Evans J.R. Revere, a nonresident senior fellow at Brookings, wrote in a note.

But the South's Winter Olympics in February were the catalyst for a flurry of diplomatic moves as South Korea's dovish leader Moon Jae-in sought to bring the two sides together, holding two summits of his own with Kim in the Demilitarized Zone that divides Korea.

Altre relazioniGrafFiotech

Discuti questo articolo

Segui i nostri GIORNALE