Nevada to execute inmate with fentanyl in U.S

Remigio Civitarese
Luglio 12, 2018

Critics are warning about the "very real risk of a botched execution" in what is to be the first USA case of capital punishment using fentanyl.

Rose said the rights group is examining why the distributor delivered the drug to the Nevada prison authorities even after it was publicly known they meant to use fentanyl to kill Dozier.

Nevada refused Pfizer's demand previous year to return the company's diazepam and fentanyl, which has been blamed for overdoses nationwide but has not been used in an execution. Dozier has insisted he wants to be executed and doesn't care if it's painful.

Clark County District Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez scheduled a hearing Wednesday to decide if the execution can take place just hours later.

A spokeswoman for Nevada Department of Corrections, Brooke Santina, told the Reno Gazette Journal the agency would not comment on the pending litigation.

Dunham, the Death Penalty Information Center official, said that if cisatracurium is used in the the Nevada execution, it would be the first time that a state publicly acknowledged using it to execute an inmate.

Alvogen, the pharmaceutical company, said in a statement that it "does not condone the use of any of its drug products, including midazolam, for use in state sponsored executions".

According to the nonprofit Death Penalty Information Center, a widely cited resource on the subject, Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Ohio, Oklahoma and Virginia have all used midazolam in three-drug executions in recent years, with questionable results.

"The Midazolam has been used in other executions in half a dozen other states with really bad consequences- seriously prolonged executions, with gasping really tortuous effects", says Nancy Hart with Nevada Coalition Against the Death Penalty.

A multinational pharmaceutical company has accused the heads of Nevada's prisons and health departments of conspiring to illegally buy one of its drugs to use in an execution on Wednesday.

But the legal challenge filed by Alvogen is only the second of its kind in the USA, said Robert Dunham, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center in Washington.

Las Vegas defense attorney Scott Coffee, who analyzes death penalty cases across the country, pointed to the drug company's reference to irreparable harm and said that even if the judge denies Alvogen's request, the company could pursue the claim with a higher court.

However, the legal challenge filed by Alvogen is only the second of its kind in the U.S., said Robert Dunham, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Centre in Washington. Nevada's first-of-its-kind plan also calls for the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl to slow Dozier's breathing and the muscle paralytic cisatracurium to prevent movement and stop his breathing.

Jordan T Smith, an assistant Nevada solicitor general, countered at Wednesday's hearing that Nevada did not put up a "smokescreen" or do anything wrong in getting the drugs.

Midazolam was substituted in May for expired prison stocks of diazepam, a similar sedative commonly known as Valium.

The midazolam is expected to render Dozier unconscious before he is injected with the fentanyl. It also said it "does not accept direct orders from prison systems or departments of correction".

The twice-convicted killer in Nevada has said he prefers death to life behind bars.

He was convicted of second-degree murder in the Arizona slaying of Jasen "Griffin" Greene and sentenced to 22 years in prison in 2005, before he was brought to Nevada to face charges in Miller's death. A witness there testified that Dozier used a sledgehammer to break Greene's limbs so the corpse would fit in a plastic tote that Dozier used to transport methamphetamine, equipment and chemicals. His decapitated torso was found in a suitcase in an apartment building trash bin, also missing lower legs and hands. The state last executed someone in 2006.

He did, however, let federal public defenders review and challenge the execution protocol drawn up past year by state medical and prison officials.

The drug was used in the execution of Joseph Wood in 2014, who took almost two hours to die, and led Arizona to stop using midazolam.

They argued that the untried three-drug combination would be less humane than putting down a pet.

Altre relazioniGrafFiotech

Discuti questo articolo

Segui i nostri GIORNALE