Red tide algae bloom killing marine life off Florida coast

Rodiano Bonacci
Agosto 6, 2018

Higher than normal concentrations are called blooms and the toxins in them can kill fish, crabs, and other marine life.

But if you look at it now, thousands of dead fish are washed up along the shore.

Red tide is a "naturally occurring algae that has been documented along Florida's Gulf Coast since the 1840s and occurs almost every year".

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say controlling the red tide is complicated.

All we do know is that marine life is dying, and there are two different types of algae.

WINK-TV News meteorologist Matt Devitt posted images on his Facebook page of fish, stingrays, manatees, turtles and a whale shark that had died. He said all of the photos were recent, and all taken in the month of July.

"Over the past week, reports were received for multiple locations in Sarasota County, in Charlotte County, in and offshore of Lee County, and in Collier County".

There have already been at least 490 manatee deaths this year as well, with 80 of them likely caused by red tide.

FWC marine turtle biologist Robbin Trindell says the increased number is due, in part, to the red tide affecting numerous beaches where the turtles nest during the summer time.

Members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are working to release some of the toxic water from the lake.

For starters, blue-green algae is very noticeable.

There's a water crisis in Southwest Florida that is wreaking havoc on wildlife.

"It's certainly disgusting", said Amy Benton, who walked along the shoreline early Thursday with a scarf over her nose and mouth as protection.

The US Federal Government met with Florida residents in late July to discuss the water quality issue after Governor Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in the area around Lake Okeechobee.

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