State of emergency as Florida battles algae

Rodiano Bonacci
Agosto 14, 2018

"As Southwest Florida and the Tampa Bay area continues to feel the devastating impacts of red tide, we will continue taking an aggressive approach by using all available resources to help our local communities", said Scott in a press release.

Under the declaration, more than $100,000 will be given to Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium in Sarasota to increase local efforts to save animals affected by red tide.

Unlike July's emergency order aimed at curbing the state's blue-green algae bloom stemming from Lake Okeechobee, today's announcement focuses on Florida's other disgusting algae problem, red tide.

In a statement, Scott said he wants to continue to combat the issue of red tide with great enthusiasm. "While we fight to learn more about this naturally-occurring phenomenon, we will continue to deploy all state resources and do everything possible to make sure that Gulf Coast residents are safe and area businesses can recover".

The Department of Environmental Protection will continue "to perform enhanced water testing, beach cleanup and public outreach, as well as the deployment of additional biologists to assist communities dealing with naturally occurring red tide".

Since 2011, Florida has invested more than $17.3 million through the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI) in red tide research, including more than $5.5 million for a partnership with Mote Marine to study the causes of red tide.

VISIT FLORIDA will also receive $500,000 to help tourism development boards in counties affected by red tide, and has been directed to start developing marketing campaigns that will follow the end of red tide blooms.

The algae has been documented along Florida's Gulf Coast since the 1840's and occurs almost every year.

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