Eliud Kipchoge smashes marathon world record by 78 seconds

Remigio Civitarese
Settembre 16, 2018

Legendary runner Eliud Kipchoge on Sunday won the Berlin Marathon and set a new world record.

The 33-year-old, widely seen as the greatest marathon runner of the modern era, ran an official time of two hours, one minute and 39 seconds on a sunny day along the flat inner-city course, smashing Dennis Kimetto's previous record that had stood since 2014.

"I lack words to describe this day", said a beaming Kipchoge, a former world champion over 5,000-metres and marathon gold medallist at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in 2016.

He passed the 35-kilometer checkpoint just a shade outside 1:41:00, suggesting a finishing time inside 2:02 was possible.

'It was really hard during the last 17 kilometres but I was truly prepared to run my own race.

"Congratulation my friend, Eliud Kipchoge, for breaking the world marathon record".

With weather conditions ideal and virtually no wind, it was clear after the opening few kilometres that Kipchoge's only opponent would be the clock and his three pacemakers were pushed to the limit to keep the tempo high as Kipchoge dipped well below world-record time by the halfway mark.

A few minutes later Gladys Cherono won the women's race in Berlin in a course record of 2:18:11, making her the fourth fastest woman in history behind Paula Radcliffe, Mary Keitany and Tirunesh Dibaba.

With three pacemakers in front of him, Kipchoge ran the first kilometre in just 2:43 - gapping the rest of the elite field immediately.

He kept injecting the pace and by the 30km mark, he was a massive 52 seconds inside World Record pace having covered the distance in a time of 1:26:45.

It was a clean sweep for Kenya after Amos Kipruto came in second with 2:06:23 while Wilson Kipsang won with 2:06:48 as the unofficial time.

Things looked to have fallen apart for Kipchoge's world record hopes after 15km.

Kipchoge will be rewarded with a total sum of €120,000 ($139,614) for his performance on Sunday, including a €50,000 bonus for the world record, a €40,000 for coming first, and €30,000 bonus for keeping his time below two hours and four minutes.

Kipchoge came agonizingly close to sporting immortality by almost running the first sub two-hour marathon past year. I have trained so well for this race and have full trust in the programs of my coach.

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