Video Shows Animals Stranded by Hurricane Florence Got Rescued in Style

Paola Ditto
Settembre 19, 2018

U.S. President Donald Trump is expected on Wednesday to visit North Carolina, where thousands of homes and roadways remain underwater and swollen rivers threaten more flooding less than a week after Hurricane Florence made landfall. According to the National Weather Service, nearly 36 inches (91 centimeters) of rain fell over the city that lies along alongside the Cape Fear River.

One person was killed in Virginia when the storm spawned about 16 tornadoes there on Monday, according to the National Weather Service.

More than 5 million gallons of partially treated sewage spilled into the Cape Fear River after power went out at a treatment plant, officials said, and the earthen dam of a pond holding hog waste was breached, spilling its contents.

Amid the devastation left behind by Hurricane Florence, former National Basketball Association superstar Michael Jordan promised a $2 million donation to help those impacted by the storm.

North Carolina's governor, Roy Cooper, warned that floodwaters would linger for days, and urged residents in the path of the hurricane who had evacuated not to return yet. The river reached 58 feet during Hurricane Matthew. He was criticized for his handling of Hurricane Maria, which devastated Puerto Rico past year, and more recently for disputing the official death toll of 3,000.

Residents in the nearby town of Conway worry that's going to send water from the rising Waccamaw River to flood their homes instead.

Passersby look at a section of washed-out road damaged by flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, now downgraded to a tropical depression, in Currie, North Carolina, U.S., September 18, 2018.

Flooded vehicles sit on a closed section of Interstate 95 in Lumberton, North Carolina, where the Lumber River overflowed following flooding from Hurricane Florence. That has hampered efforts to restore power, clear roads and allow residents to homes.

Brandon Echavarrieta struggled to stay composed as he described life post-Florence: no power for days, rotted meat in the freezer, no water or food and just one bath in a week. Thousands are already in shelters in North Carolina. Fire and rescue crews were waiting to go into many areas to assist with structural damage resulting from Florence, which has dumped up to 36 inches (91 cm) of rain in parts of North Carolina since Thursday.

Mayor Bill Saffo said two routes were now open into Wilmington, which had been completely cut off by floodwaters, but those roads could close again as water swells the Cape Fear River on the city's west side. So far, several people have died after being swept up in the storm waters, and falling trees have killed two small children.

More than 347,000 customers, mostly in the Carolinas, were without power on Tuesday morning, according to power companies, down from a peak of almost 1 million outages.

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