Was the Fourth-Warmest Year on Record

Rodiano Bonacci
Febbraio 9, 2019

2018 has officially been named the fourth hottest year on Earth, according to a new report by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Two U.S. agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the World Meteorological Organization analyzed global temperatures in slightly different ways, but each came to the same conclusion Wednesday: 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record behind 2016, 2015 and 2017. It was also nominally the warmest year for Europe (and particularly the hottest in France, Germany and Switzerland) since continental records began in 1910.

"We're no longer talking about a situation where global warming is something in the future", said Gavin A. Schmidt, who is the director of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The long-term trends are extremely robust. Their separate analyses add to decades of evidence that the burning of fossil fuels, the clearing of forests and other human activities are releasing heat-trapping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and causing the planet to warm.

NASA and NOAA independently monitor the Earth's surface temperatures and changes based on observations of both land areas and oceans, using a network of satellites scattered in Earth orbit.

"The long-term temperature trend is far more important than the ranking of individual years, and that trend is an upward one", the UN's World Mereological Organisation (WMO) secretary-general Petteri Taalas said in a statement. But in the long-term, the two agencies strongly agree on the pace and trajectory of global warming.

It was also an expensive year for natural disasters.

NASA and NOAA climate scientists said even though 2018 was a tad cooler than the three previous years that's mostly due to random weather variations. Lower than normal temperatures are shown in blue. But in the contiguous 48 states, 2018 marked the 14th warmest on record.

The November report warned that climate change will intensify over the century without swift emissions cuts. According to NASA and NOAA, there were a total of 14 billion-dollar weather and climate disaster events in the U.S.in 2018 alone, costing the nation $91 billion in direct economic damages and resulting in 247 deaths.

Dr. Schmidt spoke of these markers not as cliffs that the world would plunge over, however, but part of a continuing slide toward increasing levels of harm.

Altre relazioniGrafFiotech

Discuti questo articolo

Segui i nostri GIORNALE