Insects could be extinct within a century, scientists say

Rodiano Bonacci
Febbraio 11, 2019

Insects could become extinct in 100 years, scientists have warned.

The review, which looked at 73 studies conducted around the world, claimed that more than 40 per cent of insect species are now declining, adding that the rate of extinction is about eight times faster than the respective rate for birds, mammals and reptiles.

The projections are based on the downward trajectory of the world's insect mass, which is thought to be falling by 2.5% per year.

Francisco Sánchez-Bayo of the University of Sydney said, 'If insect species losses can not be halted, this will have catastrophic consequences for both the planet's ecosystems and for the survival of mankind. He said: 'It is very rapid.

The researchers write, 'The trends confirm that the sixth major extinction event is profoundly impacting life forms on our planet.

The decline is blamed mainly on intensive agriculture. "In 10 years you will have a quarter less, in 50 years only half left and in 100 years you will have none", co-author Francisco Sánchez-Bayo, an environmental biologist at the University of Sydney, told the Guardian.

'Unless we change our ways of producing food, insects as a whole will go down the path of extinction in a few decades.

'The repercussions this will have for the planet's ecosystems are catastrophic to say the least'.

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