Prayer time turns to terror for Christchurch shooting witness

Brunilde Fioravanti
Marzo 16, 2019

Tarrant, a 28-year-old Australian citizen, appeared in a Christchurch District Court Saturday.

Wearing a white prison suit, Tarrant appeared handcuffed and barefoot.

The judge later added it was "reasonable to assume" more charges would follow. He is due back in court on April 5 and police said he was likely to face further charges.

As New Zealand tried to come to terms with shootings at two Christchurch mosques, which police said left 49 dead and dozens injured, witnesses recounted what they saw as a gunman opened fire on worshippers.

People wait outside a mosque in central Christchurch, New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019.

Calling it a well-planned terrorist attack, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said the main suspect was a licensed gun owner who used five weapons during his rampage, including two semi-automatic weapons and two shotguns.

"We were not chosen for this act of violence because we condone racism, because we are an enclave for extremism", Ardern said during a news conference in Wellington.

There could be no more perplexing a setting for a mass slaughter than New Zealand, a nation so placid and so isolated from the mass shootings that plague the United States that police officers rarely carry guns.

Owners of firearms in New Zealand are required to have a license but they are not required to register their firearms, unlike in Australia. One was a Syrian refugee who came to New Zealand with his family - a wife and three "beautiful" children - about six months ago.

Tarrant was not known to the authorities, Bush said, and had no previous convictions.

Although shops were shuttered and many made a decision to stay at home Saturday, bouquets of flowers piled up at a makeshift memorial near the Al Noor mosque, many accompanied with handwritten letters laden with sadness and disbelief.

Pacific Islands Forum Chair and president of Nauru Baron Waqa expressed his "deepest condolences" to the people and government of New Zealand on what he called a sad day for Christchurch and a sad day for the region.

Throughout the hearing, Brenton Tarrant, who had a cut on his upper lip, remained silent and looked at the media persons in the public gallery.

But Yasalar said there is no escaping the horrendous magnitude of the events in Christchurch. On Saturday morning, dozens of people stood silently, facing the building as police went about their work. We have seen too many instances of vicious attacks in mosques, synagogues, temples, churches and other houses of worship, and it is time to say, "No More!", reads the statement.

The Herald later quoted one of the witnesses from Lindwood, Syed Mazharuddin, who said that the gunman was confronted by a mosque caretaker, who wrestled one of his guns away but did not shoot because he "couldn't find the trigger".

Wahb noted that the attacker had written the name of the Quebec City mosque shooter on his weapon, "so that actually triggers the sad feeling and the sorrow of this tragedy that happened here because we actually experienced it with a city that is close by here".

The suspected attacker had bought five guns legally.

After going back outside and shooting a woman there, he gets back in his vehicle, where a song can be heard blasting. That number has grown consistently throughout the years, with New Zealand reporting only 1.3 million such firms in 2016, 1.2 million in 2009 and less than a million in 2005. The singer bellows, "I am the god of hellfire!" and the gunman drives off before police even arrive.

He also reached out to the Muslim community in Christchurch and in New Zealand.

Altre relazioniGrafFiotech

Discuti questo articolo

Segui i nostri GIORNALE