New Zealand PM vows gun law reform after mosque massacre

Brunilde Fioravanti
Marzo 17, 2019

34-year-old Syed Jahandad Ali from Pakistan and 36-year-old Hussain Al-Umari from United Arab Emirates (UAE) died in the attacks where they regularly attended Friday prayers.

In emotional scenes, Ardern earlier met mourning members of the Muslim community in Wellington. The courtroom was closed to the public because of the heightened security risk.

Anguished relatives were anxiously waiting Sunday for authorities to release the remains of those who were killed in massacres at two mosques in the New Zealand city of Christchurch, while police announced the death toll from the racist attacks had risen to 50.

The grandmother of the man allegedly responsible for the twin Christchurch mosque terror attacks that have killed 50 has spoken to 9News of her disbelief and devastation.

People across New Zealand were still trying to come to terms with the massacre that Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described as "one of New Zealand's darkest days".

"A category-A firearm holder can purchase the firearms without the magazines or the things that will enable them to be in the state that they were", Bush said.

The first victim identified was Daoud Nabi, a 71-year-old grandfather who died trying to save someone else from a bullet, according to his son.

Meates said at a news conference at the Christchurch hospital that it's "hard to fathom the enormity of this act of terrorism".

"We struggling with it as much as everyone else". This is not something that we expected to see in our environment.

Another 34 victims remained at Christchurch Hospital, where officials said 12 were in critical condition.

During the Saturday morning hearing, a man who was not in court was charged with using writings to incite hatred against a race or ethnicity, but it was not clear if his case was related to the mosque attacks.

Ardern confirmed that the suspected gunman had not been on the radar of any intelligence agencies for extremism
Feature: Terror suspect in New Zealand Christchurch mosques attack appears in court with heightened security - Xinhua | English.news.cn

Tarrant has been remanded in custody until April 5, when he will appear again before the High Court in Christchurch.

Footage of the attack on one of the mosques was broadcast live on Facebook, and a "manifesto" was also posted online that denounced immigrants as "invaders".

None of the bodies of the victims were immediately released due to the investigation, leaving families unable to bury their dead within the 24 hours customary in Islam. "But we are so aware of the cultural and religious needs, so we are doing that as quickly and sensitively as possible", Bush said. The attack on the Al Noor and Linwood mosques has prompted an outpouring of grief and deep shock in this usually peaceful coun.

Police then rammed the gunman's vehicle and arrested him.

Meanwhile, outside the court, major roads in the city center are cordoned off with heavy armed police officers on duty. "They have prevented further deaths and risked their own lives to do so".

The country is already mourning, with many people grieving at makeshift memorials in Christchurch, while vigils and church services are being held elsewhere.

Indonesian-born aeronautical engineer Lilik Abdul Hamid and a refugee from Afghanistan, Daoud Nabi, were among the victims.

'Those decisions have yet to be taken, ' he told Radio New Zealand.

At least 49 people were killed in Friday's attack.

Mr Bush, who had earlier called the attack a "very well-planned event", said the suspect was not known to police either in New Zealand or Australia.

There will likely be additional charges, reported CBC News, but the police have yet to release details of what they may be.

Altre relazioniGrafFiotech

Discuti questo articolo

Segui i nostri GIORNALE