Facebook restricts Live feature, citing New Zealand shooting

Remigio Civitarese
Mag 15, 2019

The summit comes as there is a growing realisation that the current abuse of social media by extremists must be countered, after the Christchurch attacker broadcast live footage on Facebook from a head-mounted camera.

People who have broken certain rules, including those against "dangerous organizations and individuals", will be restricted from using the Facebook Live streaming feature, said vice president of integrity Guy Rosen.

The company will invest in a $7.5 million partnership with three universities: the University of Maryland, Cornell University and the University of California, Berkeley.

Announced on Tuesday, the company will implement a "one strike" policy which will restrict anyone who violates the social network's community standards from using Facebook Live.

Such violations would include sharing a link to a statement from a terrorist group with no context, according to Rosen.

The company said it plans to extend the restrictions to other areas over coming weeks, beginning with preventing the same people from creating ads on Facebook. Also, there's no clarity on what happens after the 'set period, ' when the user regains the ability to post live videos. Facebook was able to purge 1.5 million uploads of the video and 1.2 million were blocked before going live on the platform. It took 12 minutes after the livestream ended before it became aware of it, and that notice came from police, not from its own algorithms or human moderators.

Users wanting to share the video changed aspects of the footage to side-step AI detection; Facebook said there were 900 different variations of the footage.

Ms Ardern said co-operation on ending extremist content online was the least that should be expected from Facebook.

"(We're) asking both nations and private corporations to make changes to prevent the posting of terrorist content online, to ensure its efficient and fast removal and to prevent the use of live-streaming as a tool for broadcasting terrorist attacks", she wrote in The Times.

This move was portrayed as an effort to tackle hate speech before it could erupt into something more destructive.

However, to the disappointment of some, a notable absentee will be Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg, who held talks in Paris with Macron last week.

Neither Sandberg nor Zuckerberg will be at the Christchurch Call summit.

Altre relazioniGrafFiotech

Discuti questo articolo

Segui i nostri GIORNALE